Print This Page

Campus Connections - Arts and Culture at Elizabethtown College

Friday, January 19, 2018
11 am
Friday, January 19 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Doug Peters, regional VP, Voya Financial/Tax Exempt Markets K-12 Education

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Doug Peters, regional vice president, Voya Financial/Tax Exempt Markets K-12 Education

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu or 717-361-1982

Sunday, January 21, 2018
7:30 pm
Sunday, January 21 | 7:30 – 9pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - M&M Mars Room, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lobby, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Green Room
Oberlin Alumnae Chamber Ensemble concert

The "Australian event" is an Oberlin Alumnae Chamber Music concert, with guest pianist Dr. Hamish Tait from the Riverina Conservatorium, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales. Oberlin Conservatory of Music alumnae Anne Gross, soprano (Elizabethtown College), Lauren Davis, violin (Wagga Wagga, New South Wales) and Poppea Dorsam, cello (San Francisco area), along with Tait, present a concert of chamber music.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Monday, January 22, 2018
7 pm
Monday, January 22 | 7 – 8pmBowers Writers House
A National Horror: Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking with Dr. Susan Mapp

Tonight, Dr. Susan Mapp will discuss her most recent book - Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking - which was crafted through combining the most up-to-date scholarly literature together with interviews with professionals working directly with survivors of this crime. Mapp will discuss the current state of knowledge on this frequently misunderstood topic - what it is, who it affects, and what to do about it - as well as the writing process of bringing together these two different forms of research to gain the best of both.


Susan Mapp,  Ph.D., MSSW, is the Professor and Chair of the Social Work Department at Elizabethtown College. She has written three books in the area of human rights: Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking; Human rights and social justice in a global perspective: An introduction to international social work; and Global child welfare and well-being. She is the author of numerous book chapters and peer-reviewed articles on a variety of topics, including the impact of war on children, violations of women's human rights, law enforcement awareness of human trafficking, as well as issues relating to the child welfare system. She has presented her work at numerous national and international conferences.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018
4 pm
Tuesday, January 23 | 4 – 5pmBowers Writers House
Fiction Workshop with short-story writer Meghan Kenny

Novelist and short-story writer Meghan Kenny comes to Elizabethtown College from Lancaster where she teaches at the Lancaster Country Day School. Her first book of short stories, “Love Is No Small Thing,” was published in 2017 by LSU Press. Her debut novel, “The Driest Season,” is set to be published in February 2018 by W. W. Norton. 

Kenny’s stories have appeared in the Gettysburg, Cincinnati and Kenyon reviews and other literary magazines. She was the Peter Taylor Fellow at the Kenyon Review Writers' Workshop, a Tennessee Williams Scholar at Sewanee Writers' Conference and an Emerging Writer at Franklin & Marshall's Emerging Writers Festival. 

Cost: free
Contact: Josh Cohen at cohenjp@etown.edu or 717-361-1453

7 pm
Tuesday, January 23 | 7 – 8pmHigh Library McCormick Classroom
Public Reading -- The Fiction of Meghan Kenny: Love Is No Small Thing

Novelist and short-story writer Meghan Kenny comes to Elizabethtown College from Lancaster where she teaches at Lancaster Country Day School. Her first book of short stories, “Love Is No Small Thing,” was published in 2017 by LSU Press. Her debut novel, “The Driest Season,” is set to be published in February 2018 by W. W. Norton.

Her stories have appeared in The Gettysburg Review, Cincinnati Review, The Kenyon Review, and other literary magazines. She was the Peter Taylor Fellow at the Kenyon Review Writers' Workshop, a Tennessee Williams Scholar at Sewanee Writers' Conference, and an Emerging Writer at Franklin & Marshall's Emerging Writers Festival.

Cost: free
Contact: Josh Cohen at cohenjp@etown.edu or 717-361-1453

Thursday, January 25, 2018
4 pm
Thursday, January 25 | 4 – 7pmZug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area, Zug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
James Gallagher Art Exhibit Reception

Early artists made art that helped them to deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania, artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt that I had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2, 2018

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

7 pm
Thursday, January 25 | 7 – 9pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Global Film Festival: French film "La Haine"

This year’s Global Film Festival theme is “When Cultures Clash.”

“La Haine,” a French film, follows three young men and their time spent in the French suburban "ghetto," over a span of 24 hours. Vinz, a Jew; Saïd, an Arab; and Hubert, a black boxer, have grown up in these French suburbs where high levels of diversity coupled with the racist and oppressive police force have raised tensions to a critical breaking point.

Cost: free
Contact: Kristi Syrdahl at 717-361-1594 or syrdahlk@etown.edu

Thursday, January 25 | 7 – 8:30pmBowers Writers House
Why 'Bots Don't Bach: Practice, Rehearsal, and The Human Imagination

They say there's only one way to get to Carnegie Hall... practice, practice, practice! But what if your motherboard can't handle the work load? And what's so great about doing the same thing time after time after time... did Michael Jordan really need to take all those free throws? Did Paganini truly need to rehearse scales? Join us and three of E-town's best as we explore the nuances of studied practice, how the brain reacts to creative repetition, and how and why computers, well... don't exactly do these things like we do!

Dr. Jean Pretz is Professor and Chair of the Psychology Department at Elizabethtown College. She studies decision making with an aim to understand when intuition is insightful and when it is irrational. Her research on creativity examines its relationship with critical thinking and success in college. Participants in her studies have included engineers, nurses, military leaders, and soccer players. Dr. Pretz has published over 20 articles in peer-reviewed scholarly journals including Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts and Journal of Behavioral Decision Making. At Elizabethtown, Dr. Pretz teaches courses in neuroscience, decision making, and a seminar on intelligence and creativity. She received her BA in Psychology and Music from Wittenberg University and her M.S., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in Psychology from Yale University.

Barry Wittman is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Elizabethtown College with a Ph.D. from Purdue University.  Although his primary areas of research are programming languages and approximation algorithms, he has long held both social and professional concerns about how the interaction of human and machine intelligence will shape the future.

Dr. Badgerow joined the faculty at Elizabethtown College in 2010. He teaches coursework in theory, aural skills, and applied piano. Dr. Badgerow has performed nationally in thirteen states. He has performed internationally in Mexico, South Africa, and Brazil. Dr. Badgerow has performed solo concerto performances with the Imperial Symphony and Kennett Symphony. He has worked in collaborative performance with such artists as Patrick Mason, James Bunte, and Eddie Daniels. His primary teachers include Gary Wolf, Nancy Garrett, and Andrew Cooperstock. He has had additional collaborative coaching with Anne Epperson and Robert Spillman.

Friday, January 26, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, January 26 | 8:59 – 9amZug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
Art Exhibit: James Gallagher - artist and educator

Early artists made art that helped them deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt he had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

11 am
Friday, January 26 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Bryan Zeamer, president, Utility/Keystone Trailer Sales

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Bryan Zeamer, president, Utility/Keystone Trailer Sales

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu or 717-361-1982

Thursday, February 1, 2018
7:59 am
Thursday, February 1 | 7:59 – 8amHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
World War I and America Exhibition

Exhibit continues during normal library hours through Feb. 28.

“WWI and America” is a traveling exhibition of World War I documents, images and interpretive texts. It is a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Also on display are selections from the College's Hess Archives highlighting student, faculty and community attitudes toward and participation in the war.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at grover@etown.edu or 717-361-1506

Friday, February 2, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, February 2 | 8:59 – 9amZug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
Art Exhibit: James Gallagher - artist and educator

Early artists made art that helped them deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt he had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

11 am
Friday, February 2 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Robert M. Gratalo, partner, RKL LLP, Tax Services Group

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Robert M. Gratalo, partner, Tax Services Group

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu  or 717-361-1982

Sunday, February 4, 2018
3 pm
Sunday, February 4 | 3 – 5pmZug 205 - Recital Hall, Zug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area
Senior recital featuring Olivia Grandal, violin, and Rachel Suter, piano

Student performances featuring Olivia Grandal, violin, and Rachel Suter, piano.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, February 6, 2018
7 pm
Tuesday, February 6 | 7 – 8pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
God and Jackie Robinson: A Lecture by Michael G. Long

The faith of Jackie Robinson was a powerful but quiet engine that drove and sustained him as he shattered racial barriers on and beyond the baseball diamond. Marked by sacrifice and service, inclusiveness and hope, Robinson's faith shaped not only his character but also Major League Baseball and the United States of America. Professor Long describes and analyzes Robinson's faith during a 30-minute lecture followed by a question-and-answer period.

Cost: free
Contact: Monica M Smith smithm@etown.edu

Thursday, February 8, 2018
7:59 am
Thursday, February 8 | 7:59 – 8amHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
World War I and America Exhibition

Exhibit continues during normal library hours through Feb. 28.

“WWI and America” is a traveling exhibition of World War I documents, images and interpretive texts. It is a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Also on display are selections from the College's Hess Archives highlighting student, faculty and community attitudes toward and participation in the war.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at grover@etown.edu or 717-361-1506

7 pm
Thursday, February 8 | 7 – 8pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Awareness, Compassion and Engagement: Being an 'ACE' in Today's Ever-Challenging World

What does it mean to be aware? How can we engage our natural compassion for those around the world suffering from a variety of conditions? Join us for a dynamic experience as Wazhma Frogh discusses her work around the world enlightening audiences, and encouraging citizens of the world to learn about different people, their life styles, their struggles, and how to find relevance in the greater awareness in an ever-changing world.

Wazhma Frogh is a dynamic and passionate citizen of the world. In the eighth grade, she tutored her landlord's children so that the landlord would reduce her rent and she and her sisters could thus afford school. At age 17, she exposed poor living conditions and abuses of women in Afghan refugee camps in Pakistan while interning at a Pakistani newspaper. From 1992 to 2001, she organized community-based empowerment programs for women in Aghanistian while she herself lived in Peshawar, returning to Afghanistan in 2001. In 2002, she finished the first gender assessment of women’s conditions in Nuristan, Afghanistan. Wazhma was the co-founder (and as of 2013 is the director) of the Afghan Organization Research Institute for Women, Peace and Security. She has also written for The Guardian on the subject of Afghanistan, and in 2009 received an International Women of Courage Award.

Friday, February 9, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, February 9 | 8:59 – 9amZug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
Art Exhibit: James Gallagher - artist and educator

Early artists made art that helped them deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt he had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

11 am
Friday, February 9 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Charles Wasson, senior vice president and regional senior loan officer, Orrstown Bank

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Charles “Chip” Wasson, senior vice president and regional senior loan officer, Orrstown Bank

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu  or 717-361-1982

Sunday, February 11, 2018
3 pm
Sunday, February 11 | 3 – 5pmZug 205 - Recital Hall, Zug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area
Senior Recital: Lindsay Zumbrum, voice

Student performance featuring Lindsay Zumbrum, voice.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Monday, February 12, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, February 12 | 7:30 – 8:30pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Lecture: "Fixing Incivility in American Democracy: Lessons from Lincoln"

Dr. Matthew Moen, president of the Gettysburg Foundation, discusses how disagreement now permeates American public life, with citizens telling pollsters that political conflict is becoming a significant source of stress in their personal lives. 

How do we restore a better atmosphere? How do we build a more positive outlook? Part of the answer is looking back to respectful leaders, such as Abraham Lincoln, whose Gettysburg Address spoke clearly of the unfinished work of democracy. Another part is experimentation with public policy solutions to foster more civility. Dr. Moen is former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, professor of political science and Lohre Distinguished Professor at the University of South Dakota.

Cost: free
Contact: Kay Wolf at wolfk@etown.edu or 717-361-1147

Wednesday, February 14, 2018
11 am
Wednesday, February 14 | 11am – 12:30pmHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
WWI and America Exhibition Celebration and Lecture -- "Defining the Nation: Gender, Race and Belonging in World War I"

The reception features a buffet lunch and “Defining the Nation: Gender, Race and Belonging in World War I” with guest lecturer Chelsea Schields.

The exhibit continues during regular library hours through Feb. 28. “WWI and America,” a traveling exhibition of World War I documents, images and interpretive texts, is a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Also on display are selections from the College's Hess Archives highlighting student, faculty and community attitudes toward and participation in the war.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506, grover@etown.edu

Thursday, February 15, 2018
7:59 am
Thursday, February 15 | 7:59 – 8amHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
World War I and America Exhibition

Exhibit continues during normal library hours through Feb. 28.

“WWI and America” is a traveling exhibition of World War I documents, images and interpretive texts. It is a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Also on display are selections from the College's Hess Archives highlighting student, faculty and community attitudes toward and participation in the war.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at grover@etown.edu or 717-361-1506

7 pm
Thursday, February 15 | 7 – 9pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Global Film Festival: Ixcanul

This year’s Global Film Festival theme is “When Cultures Clash.”

In “Ixcanul,” a film from Guatemala, María, a 17-year-old Mayan (Kaqchikel) girl, lives on the slopes of an active volcano in Guatemala. An arranged marriage awaits her, but her suitor must first spend months working in the city. It is a world María knows nothing of but with which she is forced to grapple when problems arise.

Cost: free
Contact: Kristi Syrdahl at 717-361-1594 or syrdahlk@etown.edu

8 pm
Thursday, February 15 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Dead Man's Cell Phone

A continually ringing cell phone in a quiet café. A stranger at the next table who has had enough. And a dead man—with a lot of loose ends. So begins this comic odyssey, in which a woman is forced to confront her assumptions about morality, redemption and the need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. “Characters in Ruhl’s plays negotiate the no man’s land between the everyday and the mystical, talking like goofs one minute and philosophers the next.”

Cost: $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Friday, February 16, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, February 16 | 8:59 – 9amZug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
Art Exhibit: James Gallagher - artist and educator

Early artists made art that helped them deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt he had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

11 am
Friday, February 16 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Greg Smith, CEO, PSECU

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Greg Smith, CEO, PSECU

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu  or 717-361-1982

8 pm
Friday, February 16 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Dead Man's Cell Phone

A continually ringing cell phone in a quiet café. A stranger at the next table who has had enough. And a dead man—with a lot of loose ends. So begins this comic odyssey, in which a woman is forced to confront her assumptions about morality, redemption and the need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. “Characters in Ruhl’s plays negotiate the no man’s land between the everyday and the mystical, talking like goofs one minute and philosophers the next.”

Cost: $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Saturday, February 17, 2018
8 pm
Saturday, February 17 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Dead Man's Cell Phone

A continually ringing cell phone in a quiet café. A stranger at the next table who has had enough. And a dead man—with a lot of loose ends. So begins this comic odyssey, in which a woman is forced to confront her assumptions about morality, redemption and the need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. “Characters in Ruhl’s plays negotiate the no man’s land between the everyday and the mystical, talking like goofs one minute and philosophers the next.”

Cost: $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Monday, February 19, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, February 19 | 7:30 – 9:30pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lobby, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Green Room
Monday Series Concert: Piano Duo featuring Justin Badgerow and Debra Ronning

The Department of Fine and Performing Arts Monday Concert Series features faculty pianists, Justin Badgerow and Debra Ronning. The program for piano duet features the “Sinfonietta” by Nikolai Kapustin as well as the Francis Poulenc “Piano Sonata for Four Hands.” Concluding the evening will be the “Valse” by Maurice Ravel.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, February 20, 2018
12 pm
Tuesday, February 20 | 12 – 2pmMyer - Swatara Room, Myer - Susquehanna Room
Presidential Community Enrichment Series lecture -- "An Introduction to Cryptology," Timothy McDevitt, professor of math

Timothy McDevitt, professor of mathematics, explains how encryption makes secure internet communication possible and explores the difference between public and private key encryption. He demonstrates how they can be used to make secure online transactions.

McDevitt holds bachelors’ degrees in mathematics and physics from James Madison University and master’s and doctoral degrees in applied mathematics from the University of Virginia. His research interests include solid mechanics and shell theory, statistics, cryptology, and the use of mathematical software.

Cost: $17; register at iaenrichseries@etown.edu
Contact: Melissa Bittinger at bittingerm@etown.edu or 717-361-1489

7:30 pm
Tuesday, February 20 | 7:30 – 9pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
Dale Brown Book Award Lecture: "Embedded: Quilts and Their Stories" with Janneken Smucker

In this interactive presentation, Janneken Smucker discusses what we can learn about the larger culture from individual stories of quilts—seemingly everyday objects that are, in fact, embedded with sentimental, historical, artistic and spiritual heft.

In addition to recounting some of the stories from her book, "Amish Quilts: Crafting an American Icon," she will share some of her family quilt stories and interview members of the community about their quilts.

Smucker, a fifth-generation Mennonite quiltmaker, is an associate professor of history at West Chester University, where she specializes in digital and public history and American material culture. "Amish Quilts" received the Dale W. Brown Book Award for outstanding book in Anabaptist and Pietist Studies.

Cost: free
Contact: Young Center at youngctr@etown.edu or 717-361-1470

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
6 pm
Wednesday, February 21 | 6 – 8pmKAV - Brossman Commons
Spector Social Justice and Lecture Series: Social and Economic Justice with Tim Wise

Tim Wise discusses economic inequality in the United States and challenges the notion that a “culture of poverty” is to blame for generational inequality in the nation. Instead, Wise asserts that certain social structures prevent economic sufficiency and has or is leading to the creation of a permanent underclass in America.

Cost: free; reservations strongly encouraged at diversityoffice@etown.edu
Contact: Monica M Smith at smithm@etown.edu

7 pm
Wednesday, February 21 | 7 – 8:30pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Panel discussion -- "WWI and America" with Brian Newsome

Brian Newsome leads a panel discussion including veterans and conscientious objectors. Panelists reflect on readings in “WWI and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It” as well as their personal experiences of peace and war. The participants will be asked to address such complex themes as patriotism, pacifism and America's role in the international community.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506, grover@etown.edu

Thursday, February 22, 2018
7:59 am
Thursday, February 22 | 7:59 – 8amHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
World War I and America Exhibition

Exhibit continues during normal library hours through Feb. 28.

“WWI and America” is a traveling exhibition of World War I documents, images and interpretive texts. It is a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Also on display are selections from the College's Hess Archives highlighting student, faculty and community attitudes toward and participation in the war.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at grover@etown.edu or 717-361-1506

4 pm
Thursday, February 22 | 4 – 5pmBowers Writers House
Writing About the World: Craft Talk with Tom Zoellner

Join us this afternoon for a writing craft talk with author Tom Zoellner.

Tom Zoellner is the author of five nonfiction books, including Train. He is the co-author of the New York Times bestselling book An Ordinary Man, and his book Uranium won the 2011 Science Writing Award from The American Institute of Physics. Tom has worked as a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle and The Arizona Republic, and as a contributing editor for Men’s Health magazine. He is now an associate professor of English at Chapman University and the politics editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books. Tom is a founding member of the journalism collective Deca, and a teacher in the OpEd Project. Tom has received residencies from the Mesa Refuge, The Millay Colony for the Arts, the Corporation at Yaddo, and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship. He lives in Los Angeles.

7 pm
Thursday, February 22 | 7 – 8pmBowers Writers House
Science, and Other (Un)Reasonable Stuff: An Evening with Tom Zoellner

Join us for a amazing look at the world of worlds with author Tom Zoellner!

Tom Zoellner is the author of five nonfiction books, including Train. He is the co-author of the New York Times bestselling book An Ordinary Man, and his book Uranium won the 2011 Science Writing Award from The American Institute of Physics. Tom has worked as a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle and The Arizona Republic, and as a contributing editor for Men’s Health magazine. He is now an associate professor of English at Chapman University and the politics editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books. Tom is a founding member of the journalism collective Deca, and a teacher in the OpEd Project. Tom has received residencies from the Mesa Refuge, The Millay Colony for the Arts, the Corporation at Yaddo, and a Lannan Foundation Residency Fellowship. He lives in Los Angeles.

8 pm
Thursday, February 22 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Dead Man's Cell Phone

A continually ringing cell phone in a quiet café. A stranger at the next table who has had enough. And a dead man—with a lot of loose ends. So begins this comic odyssey, in which a woman is forced to confront her assumptions about morality, redemption and the need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. “Characters in Ruhl’s plays negotiate the no man’s land between the everyday and the mystical, talking like goofs one minute and philosophers the next.”

Cost: $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Friday, February 23, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, February 23 | 8:59 – 9amZug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
Art Exhibit: James Gallagher - artist and educator

Early artists made art that helped them deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt he had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

11 am
Friday, February 23 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Nick DiFrancesco, CEO and president, Pennsylvania Association of Community Bankers

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Nick DiFrancesco, CEO and president, Pennsylvania Association of Community Bankers

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu  or 717-361-1982

8 pm
Friday, February 23 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Dead Man's Cell Phone

A continually ringing cell phone in a quiet café. A stranger at the next table who has had enough. And a dead man—with a lot of loose ends. So begins this comic odyssey, in which a woman is forced to confront her assumptions about morality, redemption and the need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. “Characters in Ruhl’s plays negotiate the no man’s land between the everyday and the mystical, talking like goofs one minute and philosophers the next.”

Cost: $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Sunday, February 25, 2018
2 pm
Sunday, February 25 | 2 – 5pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: "Dead Man's Cell Phone"

A continually ringing cell phone in a quiet café. A stranger at the next table who has had enough. And a dead man—with a lot of loose ends. So begins this comic odyssey, in which a woman is forced to confront her assumptions about morality, redemption and the need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. “Characters in Ruhl’s plays negotiate the no man’s land between the everyday and the mystical, talking like goofs one minute and philosophers the next.”

Cost: $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

3 pm
Sunday, February 25 | 3 – 5pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lobby, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Green Room
Senior Recital: Justin Pechulis, piano and organ

Performance featuring Justin Pechulis on piano and organ.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Wednesday, February 28, 2018
7:59 am
Wednesday, February 28 | 7:59 – 8amHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
World War I and America Exhibition

Exhibit continues during normal library hours through Feb. 28.

“WWI and America” is a traveling exhibition of World War I documents, images and interpretive texts. It is a two-year national initiative of the Library of America presented in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Also on display are selections from the College's Hess Archives highlighting student, faculty and community attitudes toward and participation in the war.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at grover@etown.edu or 717-361-1506

Thursday, March 1, 2018
7 pm
Thursday, March 1 | 7 – 8pmBowers Writers House
Constitutional Cliffhangers: A Reading with Brian Kalt

The United States Constitution's provisions for selecting, replacing, and punishing presidents contain serious weaknesses that could lead to constitutional controversies. In Brian Kalt's amazing book Constitutional Cliffhangers: A Legal Guide for Presidents and Their Enemies, the author envisions six such controversies, such as the criminal prosecution of a sitting president, a two-term president's attempt to stay in power, the ousting of an allegedly disabled president, and more. With today's American poltical culture in a truly volitile state, this will be a reading you don't want to miss!

Brian C. Kalt is an American professor of law. He has taught at Michigan State University College of Law in East Lansing since July 2000. He received tenure in 2006, and has been a full professor and the Harold Norris Faculty Scholar since 2010. He teaches Torts and Administrative Law, and his research focuses on structural constitutional law and juries. Kalt, who received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Michigan, earned his juris doctor from Yale Law School, where he was an editor on the Yale Law Journal. After law school, he served as a law clerk for the Honorable Danny J. Boggs, U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit. He has occasionally written op-eds for national newspapers, and is the author of Constitutional Cliffhangers: A Legal Guide for Presidents and their Enemies and Sixties Sandstorm: The Fight over Establishment of a Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, 1961-1970.

Friday, March 2, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, March 2 | 8:59 – 9amZug (Hess Gallery -- For Art Exhibit Use Only)
Art Exhibit: James Gallagher - artist and educator

Early artists made art that helped them deal with what was bothering them. Six thousand years ago, Stone Age artists carved symbols on stone and building structures that were created to mark seasons and special events. These structures followed the path of the sun, the moon, the stars and the planets, especially Venus. It helped them to deal with what was bothering them. They created carvings and structures that were about rules that dictated the movement of the universe and not just a kind of decoration. 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania-artist James R. Gallagher uses a spiral as an important element in his pottery and painting. He used the cruciform shape as the basis for composition in painting, forcing him out of the comforts of using formal design elements. This is how he dealt with the things that were bothering him. He felt he had a reason to make art that wasn’t totally derivative but influenced by the markings of these early artists.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through March 2.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, March 13, 2018
12 pm
Tuesday, March 13 | 12 – 2pmMyer - Swatara Room, Myer - Susquehanna Room
Presidential Community Enrichment Series Lecture -- "American Music and the First World War" with E. Douglas Bomberger

E. Douglas Bomberger joined the faculty at Elizabethtown College in 2005. He teaches music history courses, a seminar in musicology, a repertoire class and applied piano. His music history classes connect music of all eras and genres with the persons who created them and perform them today.

Cost: $17; register at iaenrichseries@etown.edu
Contact: Melissa Bittinger at bittingerm@etown.edu or 717-361-1489

Thursday, March 15, 2018
7 pm
Thursday, March 15 | 7 – 9pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Global Film: Tangerines

This year’s Global Film Festival theme is “When Cultures Clash.”

“Tangerines” explores a rural village of ethnic Estonians in Abkhazia, a Russian-backed separatist region in the newly independent Georgia, where Ivo (Lembit Ulfsak) and his friend Margus (Elmo Nüganen) are the only two of their once large community who have not fled for Estonia after the outbreak of the war. Set during the 1992–1993 War in Abkhazia, the film is a morality tale addressing issues of conflict, reconciliation and pacifism.

Cost: free
Contact: Kristi Syrdahl at 717-361-1594 or syrdahlk@etown.edu

7:30 pm
Thursday, March 15 | 7:30 – 8:30pmZug 205 - Recital Hall
Concert: Performing the Poems of Emily Dickinson

Wild nights--wild nights! In celebration of the work of Emily Dickinson, student singers, directed by Anne Gross, will perform musical settings to some of Dickinson's iconic poems. The evening will include dramatic student readings under the direction of John Rohrkemper. Also, a Dickinson-inspired graphic design exhibit from Tara Moore's students will be on view.

Cost: free
Contact: Anne Gross at grossanne@etown.edu

Friday, March 16, 2018
11 am
Friday, March 16 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Jeannine D. Peterson, CEO, Hamilton Health Center

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Jeannine D. Peterson, CEO, Hamilton Health Center

Cost: free and open to the public
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu  or 717-361-1982

Sunday, March 18, 2018
3 pm
Sunday, March 18 | 3 – 4pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
HerStory -- A Celebration of Women in History

An engaging, live, multimedia presentation by Key Arts Productions to celebrate Women’s History Month.

In this 45-minute performance, Key Arts Production will present HerStory a journey through history honoring notable women from Abigail Adams, Harriet Tubman, Sarah Winnemucca, Susan B. Anthony Gloria Steinem, Aretha Franklin and many more!

Cost: free; reservations encouraged at diversityoffice@etown.edu
Contact: Monica M Smith at 717-361-1198 or smithm@etown.edu

Monday, March 19, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, March 19 | 7:30 – 9:30pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
Monday Series Concert: Africa - West Percussion Trio

Jamie Ryan, Ryan Korb and Josh Ryan, known as Africa→West Percussion Trio are dedicated to the performance of African and Afro-Caribbean styles of music in addition to Western music for percussion. Their unique compositions and arrangements of folkloric styles are influenced by the members’ studies abroad and with master musicians in African and Afro-Cuban genres as well as their backgrounds as classical and jazz musicians. The concept of “Africa→West” demonstrates not only the trio’s interest in folkloric music, but also how African and Caribbean music has been shaped by the experiences of Africans in the Western Hemisphere

Cost: free

Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, March 20, 2018
7 pm
Tuesday, March 20 | 7 – 9pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Second-Annual Theta Alpha Kappa Religion in Public Life Lecture -- "The Appropriation of Hagar"

Concerns about cultural appropriation abound. Dr. Nyasha Junior of Temple University tells the story of how Hagar, an enslaved Egyptian woman pivotal in the scriptures of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, came to be known as a black woman and the lessons these imagining hold for us today. Named one of “15 Indispensible Academic Twitter Accounts” by The Chronicle of Higher Education, Dr. Junior is one of the most sought after scholars on the difference race continues to make in biblical interpretation.

Cost: free
Contact: Richard Newton at 717-361-1277 or newtonr@etown.edu

Thursday, March 22, 2018
5:30 pm
Thursday, March 22 | 5:30 – 7pmMyer - Swatara Room, Myer - Susquehanna Room
Annual Young Center Spring Banquet 2018

reception at 5:30 p.m.; banquet at 6 p.m.

Open to all who are interested in the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies and its activities.

Cost: $23; reservations required by March 8
Contact: Young Center at 717-361-1470 or youngctr@etown.edu

7:30 pm
Thursday, March 22 | 7:30 – 9pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Young Center Durnbaugh Lecture 2018

Durnbaugh Lectures: “Update on the Boko Haram Crisis in Northeastern Nigeria” and “The Founding of CCEPI and Its Mission to the Displaced”

Samuel Dali, former president of the Church of the Brethren in Nigeria, presents an overview of the Boko Haram crisis, the devastation to the Church of the Brethren, and the church’s response. Rebecca Dali, founder and executive director of the Centre for Caring, Empowerment and Peace Initiatives (CCEPI), gives a brief history of the organization and discusses the plight of women in northeastern Nigeria, and IDPs (Internally Displaced Persons) and refugees in Cameroon. 

Cost: free
Contact: Young Center at 717-361-1470 or youngctr@etown.edu

Friday, March 23, 2018
10 am
Friday, March 23 | 10am – 12pmMyer - Swatara Room, Myer - Susquehanna Room
Young Center Durnbaugh Seminar 2018

Durnbaugh Seminar: “Leading a Peace Church in Terrorist Territory” and “CCEPI at Work:  Addressing the Plight of the Most Vulnerable”

Samuel Dali discusses the state of the Church of the Brethren in northern Nigeria before and after Boko Haram and reflects on his personal experience as the president of the Church of the Brethren in Nigeria. Rebecca Dali, founder and executive director of the Centre for Caring, Empowerment and Peace Initiatives (CCEPI), describes the vulnerable populations (widows, children, orphans, and escapees) and efforts to feed, clothe, house, and empower them, and relates her personal experience in the danger zones of northern Nigeria. 

Cost: free
Contact: Young Center at 717-361-1470 or youngctr@etown.edu

11 am
Friday, March 23 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: John Dame, Owner/Managing Partner, Dame Management

Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: John Dame, Owner & Managing Partner, Dame Management Strategies

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu or 717-361-1982

Saturday, March 24, 2018
11 am
Saturday, March 24 | 11am – 12pmZug 205 - Recital Hall, Zug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area
Family Concert: Open Door Recital

Children and parents are invited to the 16th Open Door Recital, a unique recital experience and interactive program of short pieces, performed by the Elizabethtown College music therapy students. All expressions of joy during the recital are encouraged. A reception follows for children to meet the performers.

Cost: free by reservation
Contact: Gene Behrens at 717-361-1991, 717-361-1212 or behrenga@etown.edu

Monday, March 26, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, March 26 | 7:30 – 9pmZug 205 - Recital Hall, Zug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area
Piano Ensemble Recital

The Elizabethtown Piano Ensemble will present an evening of keyboard music written especially for duos, duets, trios, quartets, and more!  Repertoire will feature classical repertoire as well as contemporary pieces.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Wednesday, March 28, 2018
11 am
Wednesday, March 28 | 11am – 12pmHigh Library - Open Space with Fire Place on Level 2
Ranck Lecture with April Kelly-Woessner

The Ranck Prize in Research Excellence was created by Dr. Robert O. Kerr ’64 and Mary Ann Kerr ’64 to honor Dr. John P. Ranck ’58 for his inspirational service to countless students at Elizabethtown College.

Cost: free
Contact: Peggy Stauffer at staufferp@etown.edu or 717-361-1416

7 pm
Wednesday, March 28 | 7 – 8pmBowers Writers House
From Classic to Current: Gareth Hinds, and Graphic Fiction

Perhaps no other form of fiction these days is as exciting -- or popular -- as graphic novels, and graphic fiction art. Gareth Hinds will read from his work and discuss his love for all things bookish!

Gareth Hinds is the author and illustrator of critically-acclaimed graphic novels and picture books based on classic literature and mythology. Through his work he shares his love of literature with readers young and old. His recent adaptation of The Odyssey received four starred reviews, and he is the recipient of the Boston Public Library's "Literary Lights for Children" award. He lives in the Washington, DC area with his wife. When he's not working on a book he enjoys painting landscapes and practicing aikido.

Thursday, April 5, 2018
7 pm
Thursday, April 5 | 7 – 9pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Movie Night: "A Quiet Passion"

Critically acclaimed biopic on Emily Dickinson, “A Quiet Passion,” was chosen by the New York Times as one of the best films of 2017. Starring Cynthia Nixon as the famous poet, "A Quiet Passion" presents a fresh, visually beautiful take on Dickinson's character and family life in 19th-century Amherst, Massachusetts. The Times called the film "poetic" and "exquisitely directed."

Cost: free
Contact: Josh Cohen at cohenjp@etown.edu or call 717-361-1453

Monday, April 9, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, April 9 | 7:30 – 8:30pmZug 205 - Recital Hall, Zug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area
Student Chamber Recital

Music selections by small instrumental and vocal ensembles.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
8:59 am
Tuesday, April 10 | 8:59 – 9amLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery - Art Show (2nd Floor)
31st Annual Juried Student Show

The College’s 31st Annual Juried Student Art show awards prizes for the best work in various disciplines: ceramics, computer art, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

The exhibit continues from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through April 24

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
7:30 pm
Wednesday, April 11 | 7:30 – 10pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - McCormick Gallery (1st Floor), Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - M&M Mars Room, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lobby, Leffler Chapel and
Ware Lecture -- Karen Armstrong -- "Leading a Compassionate Life"

The Judy S. ’68 and Paul W. Ware Lecture on Peacemaking features Karen Armstrong, Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, a religious historian whose books have been translated into 45 languages, who will speak on “Leading a Compassionate Life.”

A former Catholic nun who left the convent to study literature, Armstrong is an authority on world faiths, religious fundamentalism and monotheism. She was appointed to the High Level Group of the UN Alliance of Civilizations to diagnose the causes of religious extremism. Subsequently, she was awarded the Franklin D. Roosevelt Four Freedoms Medal.

Cost: free by reservation.
Contact: lecturetickets@etown.edu or 717-361-4757

Thursday, April 12, 2018
4 pm
Thursday, April 12 | 4 – 6pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery (2nd Floor)
31st-Annual Juried Student Art Show Reception

The College’s 31st-Annual Juried Student Art show awards prizes for the best work in various disciplines: ceramics, computer art, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

The exhibit  continues from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through April 24.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Thursday, April 12 | 4 – 5pmBowers Writers House
Writing About Music and Culture: An Afternoon with Author Robert Dean Lurie

Two things truly sell: Rock 'n roll and memoir. Come to Bowers this afternoon and get a bit of both with author Robert Dean Lurie!

Robert Dean Lurie is the author of No Certainty Attached: Steve Kilbey and The Church and We Can Be Heroes: The Radical Individualism of David Bowie. He has an MFA from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and In his alternate guise as a musician has produced and performed on the tribute album The Dark Side of Hall and Oates. His third book, R.E.M.: The Early Years, will be released in Fall 2018.

7 pm
Thursday, April 12 | 7 – 8pmBowers Writers House
No Certainty Attached: Author Robert Dean Lurie and Rock 'n Roll

Perhaps no other phenomenon affects our culture as much as music, and perhaps no other modern writer has captured the lives of rock stars as closely and passionately as Robert Dean Lurie. Robert reads from his own work tonight, and chats about working with and writing about stars such as Steve Kilby of The Church, David Bowie and R.E.M.

Robert Dean Lurie is the author of No Certainty Attached: Steve Kilbey and The Church and We Can Be Heroes: The Radical Individualism of David Bowie. He has an MFA from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and In his alternate guise as a musician has produced and performed on the tribute album The Dark Side of Hall and Oates. His third book, R.E.M.: The Early Years, will be released in Fall 2018.

Friday, April 13, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, April 13 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

11 am
Friday, April 13 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series:  Joe Tertel, Manager, eCommerce and Email Marketing, Rite Aid

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Joe Tertel, Manager, eCommerce and Email Marketing, Rite Aid

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu or 717-361-1982

Sunday, April 15, 2018
3 pm
Sunday, April 15 | 3 – 5pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
College-Community Orchestra Concert Spring 2018

The Elizabethtown College-Community Orchestra presents its annual spring concert.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Monday, April 16, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, April 16 | 7:30 – 9:30pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lobby, Leffler Chapel and Performance Center - Green Room
Monday Series Concert: Trio Caprice

Trio Caprice, featuring Sara Male, cello; Stephanie Sullivan, violin; and Debra Ronning, piano presents an evening of chamber music, centered on the Opus 70 (Ghost) trio by Beethoven. Works by Turina & Kreisler complete the repertoire.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, April 17, 2018
8:59 am
Tuesday, April 17 | 8:59 – 9amLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery - Art Show (2nd Floor)
31st Annual Juried Student Show

The College’s 31st Annual Juried Student Art show awards prizes for the best work in various disciplines: ceramics, computer art, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

The exhibit continues from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through April 24

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

7:30 pm
Tuesday, April 17 | 7:30 – 9:30pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
Kreider Fellow Lecture: Narrative & Meaning: Rich Complexity of Old German Baptist Brethren Belief, Culture & Practice

Tony Walsh uses Old German Baptist Brethren stories he has gathered to explore the beliefs, practices, and identity of this group that sees itself as embodying and preserving the vision and traditions of the early Brethren of Schwarzenau. Walsh is director of the Centre for the Study of Irish Protestantism and codirector of the Centre for Transformative Narrative Research at Maynooth University, County Kildare, Ireland.

Cost: free
Contact: Young Center at 717-361-1470 or youngctr@etown.edu

Thursday, April 19, 2018
6 pm
Thursday, April 19 | 6 – 7pmHigh Library Reading Commons
Voices of Conscience Exhibit Opening Reception

Dessert reception to celebrate “Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I. 

Interfaith peace panel presentation follows at 7 p.m. in Gibble Auditorium.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

7 pm
Thursday, April 19 | 7 – 8:30pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
Interfaith Peace Panel: Would I Fight? My Religious Perspective on War

Interfaith panel reflecting on religious perspectives on peace and conflict. Participants from four faith traditions (Hinduism, Islam, Christianity and Judaism) discuss what their own religion says about war and their personal faith convictions about war. 

The panel is preceded by a reception in the High Library at 6 p.m. where attendees can view, “Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I.

Cost: free
Contact person: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

8 pm
Thursday, April 19 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Rats' Tales

“Rats’ Tales” told by Carol Ann Duffy; adapted for the stage by Melly Still

When the Pied Piper of Hamelin pipes the rats away, the town chooses not to pay him. The Piper makes good on a threat and plays a hypnotic tune to draw the children of Hamelin away.  In “Rats’ Tales,” Hamelin’s parents deal with their losses by telling stories – about rats. Duffy and Still combine some world folk tales with some of Duffy’s original stories to create stirring tales of children, using fiendish plot twists, thrilling metaphors and dazzling feats of theatrical invention. As Duffy and Still return these primal stories to us, they restore the blood, guts and cruelty but also the relief, wonder and laughter when the threat is over.

Cost:  $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Friday, April 20, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, April 20 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

11 am
Friday, April 20 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Marilyn Hedge, assistant vice president, Regional Multicultural Banking Officer, BB&T

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Marilyn Hedge, assistant vice president, Regional Multicultural Banking Officer, BB&T

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu or 717-361-1982

8 pm
Friday, April 20 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Rats' Tales

“Rats’ Tales” told by Carol Ann Duffy; adapted for the stage by Melly Still

When the Pied Piper of Hamelin pipes the rats away, the town chooses not to pay him. The Piper makes good on a threat and plays a hypnotic tune to draw the children of Hamelin away.  In “Rats’ Tales,” Hamelin’s parents deal with their losses by telling stories – about rats. Duffy and Still combine some world folk tales with some of Duffy’s original stories to create stirring tales of children, using fiendish plot twists, thrilling metaphors and dazzling feats of theatrical invention. As Duffy and Still return these primal stories to us, they restore the blood, guts and cruelty but also the relief, wonder and laughter when the threat is over.

Cost:  $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Saturday, April 21, 2018
8 pm
Saturday, April 21 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Rats' Tales

“Rats’ Tales” told by Carol Ann Duffy; adapted for the stage by Melly Still

When the Pied Piper of Hamelin pipes the rats away, the town chooses not to pay him. The Piper makes good on a threat and plays a hypnotic tune to draw the children of Hamelin away.  In “Rats’ Tales,” Hamelin’s parents deal with their losses by telling stories – about rats. Duffy and Still combine some world folk tales with some of Duffy’s original stories to create stirring tales of children, using fiendish plot twists, thrilling metaphors and dazzling feats of theatrical invention. As Duffy and Still return these primal stories to us, they restore the blood, guts and cruelty but also the relief, wonder and laughter when the threat is over.

Cost:  $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Sunday, April 22, 2018
3 pm
Sunday, April 22 | 3 – 5pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
Spring Choral and Jazz Band Concert 2018

Join the Choirs and Jazz Band from Elizabethtown College for an afternoon of great music to satisfy every taste. 

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Monday, April 23, 2018
12 pm
Monday, April 23 | 12 – 2pmMyer - Swatara Room, Myer - Susquehanna Room

Art historian Patricia Likos Ricci presents an illustrated lecture on Violet Oakley (1874-1961), muralist, stained glass designer, portraitist and advocate for world peace. Famous for her murals in the Pennsylvania State Capitol, Oakley was the first American woman to receive a government commission for a civic building. Her murals in the Governor's Reception Room, the Senate Chamber and the Supreme Court embodied her visionary ideals of universal history.


Cost: $17; register at iaenrichseries@etown.edu
Contact: Melissa Bittinger at bittingerm@etown.edu or 717-361-1489

7:30 pm
Monday, April 23 | 7:30 – 8:30pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
Scholarship and Creative Arts Day Recital

The Music and Theatre and Dance divisions of Fine and Performing Arts present a showcase recital in conjunction with the College's Scholarship and Creative Arts Days.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Tuesday, April 24, 2018
8:59 am
Tuesday, April 24 | 8:59 – 9amLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery - Art Show (2nd Floor)
31st Annual Juried Student Show

The College’s 31st Annual Juried Student Art show awards prizes for the best work in various disciplines: ceramics, computer art, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking and sculpture.

The exhibit continues from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through April 24

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

11 am
Tuesday, April 24 | 11am – 12pmEsbenshade Gibble Auditorium
SCAD keynote lecture: "The Courage to Care, the Strength to Serve"

Kathleen Kennedy Townsend discusses her pioneering efforts to incorporate community contribution and service into the educational model for the curricula of the state of Maryland, as well as the importance and significance of service in education.

Cost: free
Contact: Kyle Kopko at kopkok@etown.edu or 717-361-1990

Thursday, April 26, 2018
7 pm
Thursday, April 26 | 7 – 8pmHoover 110 - Large Group Meeting Room
World War I and Lancaster Peace Churches

As the First World War was being waged in Europe, members of Mennonite and Brethren churches on the home front faced military conscription, government surveillance, and intense pressure to buy war bonds. The 1917 conscription law was ambiguous with regard to conscientious objection, although peace church members ultimately found a political ally in Lancaster County Congressman, W. W. Griest. In this presentation, Steven Nolt will describe these dynamics, and other ways that Lancaster’s peace church people experienced war-time pressures and sought to explain their convictions to their neighbors and to the government. They also struggled to know how best to help those suffering from the war’s effects. Lecture held in conjunction with a national touring exhibition on view at the High Library, “Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

8 pm
Thursday, April 26 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Rats' Tales

“Rats’ Tales” told by Carol Ann Duffy; adapted for the stage by Melly Still

When the Pied Piper of Hamelin pipes the rats away, the town chooses not to pay him. The Piper makes good on a threat and plays a hypnotic tune to draw the children of Hamelin away.  In “Rats’ Tales,” Hamelin’s parents deal with their losses by telling stories – about rats. Duffy and Still combine some world folk tales with some of Duffy’s original stories to create stirring tales of children, using fiendish plot twists, thrilling metaphors and dazzling feats of theatrical invention. As Duffy and Still return these primal stories to us, they restore the blood, guts and cruelty but also the relief, wonder and laughter when the threat is over.

Cost:  $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Friday, April 27, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, April 27 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

11 am
Friday, April 27 | 11am – 12pmHoover 212 - Case Study Room
M&M Mars Executive Lecture Series: Jackie Parker, Exec. Dir., Community and Economic Development, City of Harrisburg

M&M Mars partnered with the Elizabethtown College Department of Business to create an Executive Lecture Series geared toward bringing senior level executives from various industries to talk about their businesses and engage the audience in discussions about programs that are offered to customers.

Speaker: Jackie Z. Parker, Executive Director, Community and Economic Development, City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Cost: free
Contact: Stephanie VanderMey at vandermeys@etown.edu or 717-361-1982

8 pm
Friday, April 27 | 8 – 11pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Rats' Tales

“Rats’ Tales” told by Carol Ann Duffy; adapted for the stage by Melly Still

When the Pied Piper of Hamelin pipes the rats away, the town chooses not to pay him. The Piper makes good on a threat and plays a hypnotic tune to draw the children of Hamelin away.  In “Rats’ Tales,” Hamelin’s parents deal with their losses by telling stories – about rats. Duffy and Still combine some world folk tales with some of Duffy’s original stories to create stirring tales of children, using fiendish plot twists, thrilling metaphors and dazzling feats of theatrical invention. As Duffy and Still return these primal stories to us, they restore the blood, guts and cruelty but also the relief, wonder and laughter when the threat is over.

Cost:  $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

Sunday, April 29, 2018
2 pm
Sunday, April 29 | 2 – 5pmBSC Tempest Theatre, Bird Cage - Game Room
Theatre Production: Rats' Tales

Theatre: “Rats’ Tales” told by Carol Ann Duffy; adapted for the stage by Melly Still

When the Pied Piper of Hamelin pipes the rats away, the town chooses not to pay him. The Piper makes good on a threat and plays a hypnotic tune to draw the children of Hamelin away.  In “Rats’ Tales,” Hamelin’s parents deal with their losses by telling stories – about rats. Duffy and Still combine some world folk tales with some of Duffy’s original stories to create stirring tales of children, using fiendish plot twists, thrilling metaphors and dazzling feats of theatrical invention. As Duffy and Still return these primal stories to us, they restore the blood, guts and cruelty but also the relief, wonder and laughter when the threat is over.

Cost:  $7 at boxoffice@etown.edu or 717-361-1170
Contact: Richard Wolf-Spencer at wolfr@etown.edu or 717-361-1985

3 pm
Sunday, April 29 | 3 – 5pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
Symphonic Band Concert Spring 2018

The Elizabethtown College Symphonic Band presents a spring concert.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Monday, April 30, 2018
7:30 pm
Monday, April 30 | 7:30 – 9pmKAV - Brossman Commons
Jazz Band and Percussion Concert Spring 2018

The Elizabethtown College Jazz Band and Percussion Ensemble present a spring concert.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Wednesday, May 2, 2018
11 am
Wednesday, May 2 | 11am – 12pmZug 205 - Recital Hall, Zug - John W. Hess Gallery -Lobby Area
Fine and Performing Arts Spring Recital

The Department of Fine and Performing Arts presents a spring concert.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Friday, May 4, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, May 4 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

8 pm
Friday, May 4 | 8 – 11pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
Emotion Showcase Spring 2018

Cost: $3 for students; $5 others
Contact: Amy Reynolds at 717-361-1212 or reynoldsa@etown.edu

Saturday, May 5, 2018
8 pm
Saturday, May 5 | 8 – 11pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Musser Auditorium
Emotion Showcase Spring 2018

Cost: $3 for students; $5 others
Contact: Amy Reynolds at 717-361-1212 or reynoldsa@etown.edu

Sunday, May 6, 2018
1 pm
Sunday, May 6 | 1 – 3pmLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery (2nd Floor)
Senior Art Show Reception

Annual senior art exhibit opening reception.

Exhibit continues 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through May 19.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Monday, May 7, 2018
8:59 am
Monday, May 7 | 8:59 – 9amLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery - Art Show (2nd Floor)
Art Exhibit: Senior Show

Annual senior art exhibit. Continues9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through May 19.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Friday, May 11, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, May 11 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

Monday, May 14, 2018
8:59 am
Monday, May 14 | 8:59 – 9amLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery - Art Show (2nd Floor)
Art Exhibit: Senior Show

Annual senior art exhibit. Continues9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through May 19.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Friday, May 18, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, May 18 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

Saturday, May 19, 2018
8:59 am
Saturday, May 19 | 8:59 – 9amLeffler Chapel and Performance Center - Lyet Gallery - Art Show (2nd Floor)
Art Exhibit: Senior Show

Annual senior art exhibit. Continues9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday through May 19.

Cost: free
Contact: Amy Reynolds at reynoldsa@etown.edu or 361-1212

Friday, May 25, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, May 25 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

Friday, June 1, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, June 1 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

Friday, June 8, 2018
8:59 am
Friday, June 8 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

Wednesday, June 20, 2018
8:59 am
Wednesday, June 20 | 8:59 – 9amHL WINTERS ALCOVE DISPLAYS
Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War

“Voices of Conscience: Peace Witness in the Great War,” a national touring exhibition, which explores the experiences of conscientious objectors during World War I, lifts up the prophetic insights and the personal courage of WWI peace protesters and suggests parallels to the culture of war and violence in our world today.

Exhibit continues during regular High Library hours through Wednesday, June 20.

Cost: free
Contact: Rachel Grove Rohrbaugh at 717-361-1506 or grover@etown.edu

Printed: Thursday, January 18, 2018 at 5:45 AM PST Calendar events displayed in Eastern Standard Time/Eastern Daylight Time